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MyDerm Blog

Why You Should Let A Dermatologist Take A Look At That Rash

Friday, September 28, 2018

 


Rashes come in all shapes and sizes. Even if your rash is not causing any immediate issues, it could quickly develop into something more serious. Let's take a look at why you should let a dermatologist take a look at that rash.

Diagnosis

There are three main categories of rashes. Infectious rashes include fungal, viral and bacterial infections. Inflammatory rashes enlarge the pocket of skin for various amounts of time. Finally, rashes linked to your immune system are triggered by antibodies passing through your skin. Without proper medical experience, it is difficult to identify which type of rash you have. Because all of these rashes have unique treatments, it is necessary to have a dermatologist's input on the best course of action. Sometimes, a rash can result as a byproduct of many of the above factors, and it's nearly impossible to diagnose these hybrid rashes on your own.

Escalation

Your rash might look small and relatively harmless, but it can rapidly escalate into a serious condition. Chronic rashes last for weeks and only get worse as the skin is exposed to bacteria and the fabric of your clothing. If you are able to treat a rash during its development, the time to recovery is nearly cut in half as opposed to if you let the infection spread. When you visit a dermatologist, he or she can prescribe pharmaceutical treatment within 24 hours. Time is of the essence for rashes, and putting off a visit to the dermatologist can exponentially increase the severity of the condition.

Documentation

Rash documentation is very important for treatment. Your dermatologist wants to be aware of the full progression of the rash in order to track changes and make fully-informed decisions. During your appointment, your dermatologist will take pictures and scans of your rash for future use. You will also likely fill out forms indicating your medical history. If the rash does escalate, all this information can be used to optimize your treatment and road to recovery. In any case, details about your rash are crucial additions to your medical record.

Overall health

An untreated rash isn't just a nuisance. It can be detrimental to your overall health, including sleep habits, physical activity and mental attentiveness. The antibodies and symptoms from an isolated rash can spread across your body, and your immune system can quickly break down if left unattended. A single rash can easily be contained by a dermatologist, so you don't want to be negligent and let this impact your daily lifestyle.

Conclusion

Your rash might be annoying and a little sore on the surface, but there could be much larger underlying issues beneath your skin. It's essential that you visit a dermatologist who can take a look at that rash and provide you with the optimal treatment.

 

What to Look Out for While Camping

Monday, August 06, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camping in the wild outdoors can be great family fun. Crackling campfires, inspiring nature walks, swimming at the beach, adventurous hikes on dusty, rugged trails, fun outdoor games, basking in the sunshine and the very best grilled foods - these are some of the family's best memories. But along with these enjoyable festivities, spending time with nature can also produce some very special hazards.

The Dangers

Here are some of the potential dangers to be aware of when camping:

Ultraviolet Light Exposure

There are three basic types of skin cancer: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Melanoma. The most common cause of all three is extended exposure to ultraviolet light, such as found in direct sunlight.

Camping can be fun, but it's important to monitor how much time is spent in the sun. Long sleeves, pants, gloves, and wide-brimmed hats all provide protection from direct sunlight. Finding locations to relax in the shade of trees or under an umbrella can keep that outdoor experience without the hazard of direct UV sunlight. A good, high-protection sunblock is also very helpful for reducing the effects of the sun’s rays if applied directly and often.

A potential problem can manifest itself through changes to a mole or other patches of skin. Differences in color, size or texture may be a warning sign and require immediate attention.

Poison Ivy and Poison Oak

Two of the most troublesome hazards found in the wild are poison oak and poison ivy. Exposure to either of these vining plants can produce painful sores, incessant itching, and overall general discomfort.

A good plan for avoiding these when camping is to study the appearance of each, along with how they grow and where they are commonly found. Avoid walking through clusters of unknown grasses, brush, or rubbing against trees with foliage attached. Learn to identify the two plants by their leaves and vines, and note any occurrences to share with the other campers.

Any suspected outbreak should be immediately diagnosed and treated by a dermatological professional before it has a chance to spread.

Ringworm

Despite its name, ringworm is not a worm but instead a fungus. It can be contracted nearly anywhere in the wild and is identified by its typical circular pattern of rash. A suspected ringworm infliction should be treated by a professional dermatologist as soon as possible.

The Solution

Camping is fun but the potential for complications exist. Staying aware and alert can catch a problem quickly that might otherwise go undetected.

Any symptoms or possible evidence of an issue, however minor, should be checked out. The most effective treatments for skin problems come with early detection, so it is crucial that any possible afflictions be located and treated immediately.

Dermatology Consultants of Frisco provides full-featured, professional diagnosis and treatment of skin afflictions and diseases. A simple consultation can catch many serious problems in their infancy and resolve them quickly, professionally and effectively.

Common Skin Conditions

Tuesday, July 24, 2018


Skin is the largest organ in our bodies and our protection against the outside world. Just about everyone encounters issues from time to time with their skin. Thankfully though, many of the more common skin conditions can be addressed through modern dermatology. Below are outlined a few of these conditions, including acne, moles, and rashes, as well as how they are normally treated.

Acne

Acne is probably the most well-known skin condition on earth. Most adolescents go through a phase where facial acne is very common due to high levels of oil production. However, acne in adulthood and in other areas of the body are also fairly common.

Acne causes small pustules, most frequently red pimples filled with pus, to form on the surface of the skin. Other types of acne include papules, caused by hair follicles, as well as nodules and cysts, both of which develop below the surface of the skin.

Acne can be treated with topical cleanser and creams and, if necessary, advanced medication. Prescription medication can help in severe cases and with the treatment of cysts specifically.

Hives

Another common skin condition is hives. Hives are small, itchy bumps that form on the surface of the skin. Generally, hives result from an allergic reaction in the body, but may be a response to stress or sickness. The best way to prevent hives is to avoid all allergens. If an outbreak occurs, it can be treated with antihistamines.

Warts

A very unpleasant but common skin condition faced by many is warts. Warts are a highly contagious skin condition that can affect any part of the skin, but usually show up on the hands and feet. Warts will often disappear naturally, but they can also be treated by a dermatologist. Usually, the use of medicated creams or freezing can clear up warts.

Cold sores

It's not uncommon to develop cold sores, especially when coming down with a case of a full cold. A cold sore is usually a red blister which forms around the mouth. Cold sores can be irritating or painful, but you will likely experience discomfort or itching in the spot of the sore.

Cold sores can last for several weeks and recur over time when associated with the herpes virus. The herpes virus does not currently have an established cure. That said, cold sores can be treated by dermatologists using creams or prescription medicines.

Measles

Those with children know that measles is a very contagious condition. In addition to young children, measles tends to affect pregnant women more than other adults. Measles in not just a skin condition, however. Symptoms include fever, runny eyes and nasal passages, and often coughing. Additionally, measles tends to cause red spots within the mouth and a generalized body rash. Measles can be treated by a doctor but will taper off on its own after one or two weeks.

Skin issues are a fact of life. With the right dermatological care, however, you can regain your perfect skin. Contact Dermatology Center of Frisco for more information or to schedule a consultation today.


Odd Rash on Your Child? It Could be Molluscum Contagiosum.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

 

What Is Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a viral infection that affects an individual's skin. It is most commonly observed in children, although it can occur at any age. MC is usually a harmless skin rash that will get better within a few months without any specialized treatment. However, it is all too common for the condition to spread around the body take up to 18 months or more for the condition to clear up completely.

What Does Molluscum Contagiosum Look Like?

If you have noticed an odd rash on your child, then chances are it could be MC. In most instances, the only symptom of MC is small, raised spots on the skin that have a small dimple in the middle. The spots are not painful but are usually rather itchy. These spots can appear in small clusters and can be spread all around different parts of the body. The most common places for these spots to appear is around the armpit, behind the knees, or on the groin. It is possible for MC to affect an individual on more than one occasion, but this is very uncommon.

The spots will generally be red or pink, although they may have a tiny yellow or white head in the middle. If this head splits, then a thick substance will be released, which is extremely infectious. It is vital to never attempt to pop the spots as this will more than likely lead the infection to spread to other parts of the body. Most children will have only around 20 to 30 spots on their body, although if they have a weakened immune system it is likely that they will have more.

In the majority of cases, individual spots will begin to crust over and heal within two months of appearing. Some individuals may experience mild swelling and redness in the affected areas as they begin the healing process.

Treating Molluscum Contagiosum

In most instances treatments for MC are not necessary. This is because the infection will usually clear up by itself without any other symptoms apart from the spots. The infection doesn't normally interfere with an individual's everyday life either, and some treatment methods can be painful and cause scarring. If treatment is required, then a dermatologist will likely prescribe liquids, creams, or gels that can be applied directly to the affected area. In some instances, Dermatology Consultants of Frisco will recommend minor procedures such as cryotherapy, a simple procedure whereby the spots will be removed by being frozen.

For more information on treating MC, visit our website or contact us today and see how we can help you or your child.


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